The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology: A Day Long Celebration

“Failure informs me,” William Cornell said. “You can’t learn if you’re not disturbed.” With 45 years in the field, William certainly understands the importance of noticing what excites you and what disturbs you—these are your learning edge, your leading edge, he said.

The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology: A Day Long Celebration

Current state of body psychotherapy research and contemporary somatic psychotherapeutic practices with Ilse Schmidt-Zimmerman.

The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology: A Day LongCelebration

Post-modern challenges to embodiment and human vitality: a view from the street and the therapy room with Gustl Marlock

Trauma Treatment in Today’s World: A Call for Papers

SPT magazine offers its call for papers for the Fall 2015 issue that will focus on Trauma Treatment from a Global Perspective.

The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology: A Day Long Celebration

How the latest research in epigenetics, neuroscience, polyvagal and attachment theories are making somatic psychology and body psychotherapy foundational for effective clinical practice, according to Dr Marti Glenn.

The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology: A Day Long Celebration

In today's cultural climate, it's essential to appreciate that people live in systems of oppression. We need to ask ourselves: What is it like to live within that system, a system that is not going away? How do you leave therapy and go back to that prejudicial system? How do you work with the internalization of oppression on part of the self?
Dr. Jacqueline Carleton

The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology: A Day Long Celebration

Medical trauma in patients and providers: interpersonal neurobiology and the autonomic nervous system with Jacqueline Carleton, PhD

On the Significance of “Bodymind” Visioning for the Profession and for the Planet

Having accepted her kind invitation to offer the Thursday Keynote at the 2016 USABP Conference, I pondered how to respond to President Beth Haessig's request that I say something that will help bodymind psychotherapists and somatic healers to comprehend, more broadly and more deeply than some do, the crucial importance of their work, and the visions that it might represent. That is, going beyond the healing offered to individuals and small groups who benefit from our professional practices, what is the more general, historical and cultural significance of the "bodymind" movement? Although I have not yet planned my talk, I am considering a free‑wheeling exploration of the ways in which healing must address—directly or indirectly, somatically and spiritually—the distinctive human capacity for hatred.